The Christmas Greek sweet was associated with the dead

The history of the name of a well-known Christmas sweet

One of the Greek sweets that are identified with the spirit of Christmas is undoubtedly the melomakarone! But where does the word “melomacarone” come from and what is its relation to the dead?

Christmas Greek sweet, The Christmas Greek sweet was associated with the dead
Christmas Greek sweet, The Christmas Greek sweet was associated with the dead

Melomacarones have an etymologically ancient Greek origin, although in its first sound, their name refers to the Italian spaghetti. The dictionary says that the word “macaroni” is comes from the medieval Greek word “macaroni”, a pasta-based funeral dinner where the dead were blessed.

This pasta “makaroni” in turn comes from the ancient Greek word “makaria”, which was nothing more than a psycho-pie, that is a piece of bread in the shape of modern melomakarone, which was offered after the funeral.

Christmas Greek sweet, The Christmas Greek sweet was associated with the dead

Later, when the macaroni was mixed with honey syrup it was called: honey (meli in greek language)+ macaroni =melomakarone.

The Latins and later the Italians used the word macaroni as maccarone which eventually came to mean spaghetti, while in the Middle Ages, in France and England, a kind of almond biscuit was called and it well known as “macaroon”.

Christmas Greek sweet, The Christmas Greek sweet was associated with the dead

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